Questions and Answers about White Wines

Where does white wine get its not so white color?


The color can be derived from an assortment of grape varietals. White wines are made from the grape juice and grape skin of green, gold or yellowish colored grapes or from just the juice (not the skin) of select red grapes (as in some Champagnes).

The Champagne
we know and love comes exclusively from the Champagne region of France, and claims the honor of being the most famous of the sparkling wines. Technically, it is the only sparkling wine that may be referred to as "Champagne." Bubbly from all other regions in the world are simply referred to as "sparkling wine."

Riesling wines originated in Germany's Rhein and Mosel river valleys, it was here that this white grape gained its tenacious foothold in today's modern white wine market. A Riesling wine can span a broad range of styles, being produced in both dry to sweet variations as well as light to full-bodied.

Chardonnay, America's number one selling white wine varietal, continues to climb the production ladders to emerge as the most beloved of dry white wines in the U.S. The Chardonnay grape itself also contributes to the wine's popularity. It is a “low-maintenance” vine that adapts well to a variety of climates, resulting in fairly high yields worldwide. These high yields translate into millions of bottles of Chardonnay wines. As a result, you can buy a good bottle of Chardonnay relatively inexpensive.

A quick reference to the major types of white wine varietals.

Albarino
Chardonnay
Chenin Blanc
Gewurztraminer
Gruner Veltliner
Kerner
Müller-Thurgau
Pinot Blanc
Pinot Gris/Pinot Grigio
Riesling
Sauvignon Blanc
Riesling Wines




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